It’s not just Netflix. Hulu, BBC iPlayer, HBO Now, and several other streaming providers have all implemented VPN bans at some level. Should the trend continue, legally watching licensed content online from any site would require users to relinquish their privacy. Constantly maintaining a Netflix workaround requires significant resources. Each of the VPNs we contacted was optimistic, but not certain, that they would still have a workaround six months from now.
I think you do your readers a great disservice when you make such a broad claim as "absolutely NO FREE VPN service works with Netflix" simply because you subscribe to the rediculous notion that it's possible for you to test every vpn provider that exists on the planet earth whether it be in the past, present and future. Narrow-minded self importance does not, nor will it ever, impress me.
HideMyAss recently added servers specifically for users who want to unblock US and UK Netflix. We have tested it and confirmed it works on both desktop browser and Netflix’s mobile app on Android and iOS. We recommend you contact HMA’s customer support to ask which server to use and troubleshoot any issues you might have connecting, as you might need to change some other settings on your device as well. The US server also unblocks Hulu.
The Dedicated IP option requires an add-on purchase (discussed below). The Unblocking option defaults to a nearby country that doesn't have restricted content. If you're looking to access websites blocked by your local government, this is the option for you. I'm not clear on Secure Download options, however. When I selected it, Ivacy connected me to a VPN server in Belgium. To my mind, the Belgians are known for their excellent beer and not so much their prestige in downloading.
For its part, Ivacy uses only 26 virtual servers. Hide My Ass, on the other hand, is able to support its incredible number of server locations because only 61 of its servers are physical. The rest, numbering almost 300 servers, are virtual. NordVPN has no virtual servers, while Private Internet Access and TunnelBear use virtual servers to accommodate users rather than support faux-locations.

The number of servers, however, can be a bit deceiving. Some VPN companies make extensive use of virtual server locations. These are physical servers configured to behave as if they are actually several servers in different locations. This is an issue for anyone concerned about the precise path of their data. You might be miffed to discover that by selecting a server in the data haven of Iceland, that it was actually being routed through a virtual server in Shanghai.


I then drop the highest and lowest results and average what remains to use as a baseline. Next I perform the same tests, but with the VPN active, and compare the results in order to find a percentage change. In order to get a sense of how spoofing your location with a VPN affects performance, I perform the international version of these tests, using a VPN server in Australia and an Ookla test server in Anchorage, Alaska. Because I couldn't connect to an Australian server with Ivacy, I selected the next-furthest service from the towering PCMag Labs in New York City.
It’s not just Netflix. Hulu, BBC iPlayer, HBO Now, and several other streaming providers have all implemented VPN bans at some level. Should the trend continue, legally watching licensed content online from any site would require users to relinquish their privacy. Constantly maintaining a Netflix workaround requires significant resources. Each of the VPNs we contacted was optimistic, but not certain, that they would still have a workaround six months from now.
VPN, shorts for Virtual Private Network, refers to a service or tool to hide your actual IP and keep your location anonymous while your browse on the internet. The main purpose is to protect your internet connection through a secure and encrypted network so that your data and information sent or received through the VPN is well protected, even when you are using a public WiFi. In other words, VPN keeps your private and safe while you surf on the web.
For each test, our staff connected to the VPN, opened Netflix in a browser or in the Netflix app (depending on the OS), and played a video. If the video played normally, the VPN scored a positive result. If it wasn’t clear which server to connect to for a given VPN, we contacted the VPN’s customer support team to ask which servers work with Netflix.
In particular, they're blocking IP addresses associated with Virtual Private Networks (VPNs), where software routes a user's web traffic through a foreign server so that when they hit a website it appears as though they're connecting from the country where that server is located. VPNs allow someone in New York to go through a server in, say, London, England, and watch the additional content available on Netflix in that region.

But there is already something that resembles this model. Hola, which bills itself as a P2P VPN. That name may ring a bell for all the wrong reasons, however. In the middle of last year, researchers warned not only about serious vulnerabilities in the Hola client, but claimed it was quietly selling on traffic for its premium customers and allowing outsiders to take a measure of control over users' computers. The company blew this off as a histrionic reaction to a legitimate service, but that didn't stop Google chucking the browser add-on from its app store.
Surfshark VPN gives you the freedom to access the internet with security and privacy. This VPN ensures that your location is kept secret. It also prevents all the phishing attempts along with trackers, malware and ads. You can protect unlimited devices with one account of Surfshark. All you need to do is Connect & Use. It allows you to whitelist certain apps and websites to bypass the VPN. Surfshark doesn’t keep a track or store your online activities. It comes with a kill switch, which can be used in case the VPN connection dips so that your sensitive information is never exposed.
Access Denied. It's a phrase all too prevalent on what was supposed to be a free and open web. Of late, users who either want to access foreign content on the likes of Netflix , Hulu and the BBC or simply want to remain private on the web (or both) are seeing it all too much. That's because those huge streaming organizations are all aggressively blocking certain IP addresses - the unique numbers that represent an internet-connected device.
Brute force attacks will target a specific website’s login page and attempt to crack the username and password combinations by running through endless variations until they eventually land on the right one. They test one letter or number at a time, and continue cycling through, adding more digits until they eventually figure out how to gain access.
×