When you surf the web, your internet traffic isn't necessarily secure. Someone could be lurking on the same network as you, monitoring your activities. That's especially true when you're using a public Wi-Fi network. Clever attackers can even create bogus Wi-Fi networks that impersonate legit ones, tricking you into connecting and exposing your personal information.
Apparently it is under the 5 eyes legal jurisdiction so that's a serious issue for oppressive internet regulation, who knows what could be traced or planted on your tech under these circumstances, there are many affordable VPNs running in countries outside this law i would recommend you go to them instead. Also the auto-connect feature is bogus for me and doesn't work, it just sits at "connecting" then times out, you have to manually pick which country you can login with, and PC users can't pick their city to login to but phone users can? why? Could be better, a lot better.
Max Eddy is a Software Analyst, taking a critical eye to the Android OS and security services. He's also PCMag's foremost authority on weather stations and digital scrapbooking software. He spends much of his time polishing his tinfoil hat and plumbing the depths of the Dark Web. Prior to PCMag, Max wrote for the International Digital Times, The... See Full Bio

Using a free VPN for anonymous torrenting is generally a no-no. Due to the large amount of bandwidth required, many free VPN services prohibit P2P activity. Others aren’t secure, and many have data caps. The common adage that comes with free services is that if you don’t buy the product, then you are the product. This is especially true because a VPN isn’t just a piece of software, it’s an ongoing service that requires continuous resources and maintenance.
The main reason to use a VPN is to protect your data from being spied upon by ISPs, hackers, and three-letter government agencies. So it wouldn't make sense to use a service that would spy on you, too. In order to evaluate what efforts VPN companies take to protect your privacy, I read through their entire privacy policy and discuss issues with company representatives.
For the Mac, Ivacy offers just one app. You won't, however, find it in the official Mac App Store. You have to download it from the Ivacy website instead. We haven't had the chance to bring this app into the labs for testing just yet, but I will update this review once we do. The competition between macOS VPN apps is heating up, as nearly every single VPN company now supports the fruit-flavored computer maker.

It is obvious that Ivacy is a brilliant VPN to use alongside IPTV. Not only does it lifts geo-restrictions allowing you to harness the full potential of IPTV, it also adds to a sense of security that you wouldn't experience without it. The security is iron clad, and is practically impregnable. If you want to enjoy IPTV streaming from anywhere in the world Ivacy VPN ought to be your pick.
We all know that Ivacy VPN offers a whole host of benefits, the most prominent of which is the fact that it allows you to access, quite literally, a whole world of entertainment. Streaming entertainment is always something that has been considered very costly and even when you do pay good money, you're limited to a small variety of programs. When you use Ivacy VPN in conjunction with IPTV, both of these conundrums come to a rapid end.
Chrome Extension has been promised like a year ago, my subscription is about to expire and no extensions to date. Pure promises, not mention slow Torrent download and disconnection. They bragged that they are working on their Chrome Extension, how funny was that working on a single feature for more than a year??? I guess you only have one developer for God Sake.
×