When using a Netflix native app, however, the app can override the DNS routing used by a VPN and send requests to your nearest public DNS server. This means Netflix can determine the user’s true location and block them accordingly, even with a VPN app switched on. ExpressVPN and NordVPN have figured out how to overcome this behavior, so they both work with the iOS and Android Netflix apps so this won’t be a problem for if you are using one of these two VPNs.
Overall, Ivacy performed remarkably poorly in the domestic tests. I assume this is because of its comparatively small pool of servers. Companies with more, or more strategic, server placement are more likely to provide better service since you are more likely to be close to their servers. Ivacy's international performance was better, but it only showed better results than its domestic scores; it never stood out in an already crowded space. TorGuard VPN is, for now, the fastest VPN I've yet tested, as it has the smallest impact on internet performance.
It's also important to know where your VPN company is located, since this dictates the legal jurisdiction under which it operates. Because of their location, some companies may be required to hold on to certain data for set periods of time, or need to cooperate with different law enforcement bodies. Ivacy is located in Singapore and operates under that legal jurisdiction. Personally, I do not believe that I can judge the quality of any company based solely on its location, but it is still an important consideration. I encourage everyone to make their own decisions in this regard, and use the service they feel comfortable with.

Antivirus software protects you from malware, but to protect your privacy and security on the web, you need a virtual private network, or VPN. Ivacy offers VPN protection at an affordable price and boasts servers in far-flung corners of the world. It's a strong offering on paper, but we had some hiccups in testing. At the end of the day, it can't match our Editors' Choice winners NordVPN, Private Internet Access, and TunnelBear VPN in terms of robustness or ease of use.


The short answer is that, yes, a VPN can shield your online activities from your ISP. And that's a good thing, not only if you have legally iffy torrenting habits, but also because it protects your privacy in general. An online survey of 1,000 conducted by PCMag found that 25 percent of respondents named ISPs as the biggest threat to their online privacy. That's entirely correct.
Windscribe VPN is a Canadian VPN provider that has made a dent in the low-end VPN market. They claim not to keep any logs of activity, and their software is quite good. Windscribe is also one of the last remaining VPNs that works reliably with Netflix without generating the dreaded 'proxy error'. (Hint: NordVPN is another that works flawlessly with Netflix). 
Some VPNs redirect users to the US version of Netflix regardless of server location. NordVPN, for example, can unblock Netflix when connected to any country, but uses a DNS proxy to route Netflix requests to the US version, except for Australia, Canada, Japan, Netherlands, and UK. Opening Netflix while connected to any other country through NordVPN will return the US version. And though Surfshark users can access Netflix on any server, they all redirect to the US version except France, India, Japan, the Netherlands, and the UK. Similarly, AirVPN redirects many international users to US Netflix regardless of their VPN server’s IP address.
Online piracy laws are a little fuzzy in India. A slew of news reports from 2016 suggested that even viewing certain web pages or torrent files (not the copyrighted content itself) was enough to penalize netizens with heavy fines and jail time. This is not true, however; the rumor arose from a poorly-worded warning from Indian ISPs that appeared when users tried to access blocked sites.
Online piracy laws are a little fuzzy in India. A slew of news reports from 2016 suggested that even viewing certain web pages or torrent files (not the copyrighted content itself) was enough to penalize netizens with heavy fines and jail time. This is not true, however; the rumor arose from a poorly-worded warning from Indian ISPs that appeared when users tried to access blocked sites.
One of the major reasons why people recommend VPN over proxies is that torrent clients reveal your true location and leak information while using proxy. Although, the latest version of torrent clients are designed to do a better job at this but I personally don’t trust proxy services. They can be unreliable and fail to protect you while using torrents. I would rather stick with a VPN just because of this. Currently, I am using PIA (Private Internet Access) but I have also heard good reviews about PureVPN.
Other noteworthy settings within the Ivacy app are a protocol selector, IPv6 leak protection, and a Kill Switch. This prevents your computer from communicating over an unencrypted channel should Ivacy become temporarily disconnected. Also notable is the split tunneling option, which lets you decide which apps should deliver their traffic through the VPN tunnel. I had no trouble using the selector tool to choose my protected apps.
With a VPN, you can circumvent all ISP restrictions placed on torrenting, as well as remain private and secure while downloading torrents. However, for the latter, you’ll need a VPN with a Kill switch, a feature that you won’t get for free. Without that, your identity will be exposed in case of a disconnection. While you can torrent to some extent with some of the best free VPNs for torrenting, getting one of the premium VPNs above will prove worth every cent. You can even take advantage of their 30-day money-back guarantee and torrent free!
These attacks are the culprits in some of the most common you hear about every single day on the news. For example, brute force attacks are one of the leading ways people gain access to WordPress websites (which is the single biggest platform on the internet). They’re also the method that’s commonly used to hack into celebrity iCloud accounts and leak… well, private, photos and videos.
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