Security Kiss comes with several plans and the free one gives access to 4 locations. It supports OpenVPN on Windows and Mac, which is the preferred protocol. With a daily limit of 300 MB, there is not much torrenting you can do, but if you plan to download a few songs or lightweight apk files, it can be useful. Click here to learn what real users think of Security Kiss.
Awful VPN. The app has a ton of features, but take a closer look and see most of them don't actually work at all. Split tunnelling for instance only appears to split you traffic, but actually doesn't. The worst are the dropouts in connection that remain undetected. While running the app I have checked my IP regularly for a full day. Over the course of 8 hours my IP wasn't hidden for 14 (!) times. The app itself just keeps running and even the internet kill switch doesn't kick into action therefore committing the cardinal VPN sin of letting it's user IP exposed.
Apparently it is under the 5 eyes legal jurisdiction so that's a serious issue for oppressive internet regulation, who knows what could be traced or planted on your tech under these circumstances, there are many affordable VPNs running in countries outside this law i would recommend you go to them instead. Also the auto-connect feature is bogus for me and doesn't work, it just sits at "connecting" then times out, you have to manually pick which country you can login with, and PC users can't pick their city to login to but phone users can? why? Could be better, a lot better.

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Some VPN services offer even longer subscription periods. KeepSolid VPN Unlimited, for example, lives up to its name with an effectively life-long plan. It also offers billing periods as short as one week, which is great for travelers who want a VPN only for a vacation or business trip. At PCMag, however, we recommend using a VPN as often as possible.
When you look at VPN services for regular users, you don’t often see purpose-based server recommendations, such as “use this server for streaming and this one for downloading.” Ivacy VPN, a 10-year-old service officially based in Singapore, stands out by doing just that. (It’s not the only service to take this tack—CyberGhost has a similar purpose-based approach—but it’s still rare.)
Apart from being able to unblock Netflix and its massive library of movies, TV shows, documentaries and more; you will benefit from a drastic increase in bandwidth speeds. A lot of people are not aware of the fact that ISPs throttling is an issue. Due to ISP throttling, you are prevented from getting a seamless experience, but that will not be the case if you stay connected to Ivacy’s highly optimized servers.
Using a free VPN for anonymous torrenting is generally a no-no. Due to the large amount of bandwidth required, many free VPN services prohibit P2P activity. Others aren’t secure, and many have data caps. The common adage that comes with free services is that if you don’t buy the product, then you are the product. This is especially true because a VPN isn’t just a piece of software, it’s an ongoing service that requires continuous resources and maintenance.
You’ll get slower download speeds. Running your connection through another server inevitably slows you down, though how much depends on what torrent you’re downloading, who from, and a lot of other factors. In my experience, more popular torrents stayed at their top speed of 3.4 MB/s (my bandwidth cap) with a proxy, while other less popular torrents slowed down from 1 MB/s to about 500-600 kB/s. Your mileage may vary. I lost significantly less speed with Private Internet Access than I did with BTGuard, though.
The main reason to use a VPN is to protect your data from being spied upon by ISPs, hackers, and three-letter government agencies. So it wouldn't make sense to use a service that would spy on you, too. In order to evaluate what efforts VPN companies take to protect your privacy, I read through their entire privacy policy and discuss issues with company representatives.
The practical upshot is that no one can intercept your web traffic as it moves from your computer to the VPN server. And if you're connecting to websites via HTTPS (which you should), your data remains encrypted for its entire journey, even after it leaves the VPN server. This is why you need a VPN. VPNs are particularly important when you're using public Wi-Fi or unfamiliar networks. In these situations, hackers may be lurking on the network or even running the network themselves, hoping to snag your personal information.

Ivacy has a bare-bones offering out of the box. You can spice things up with a NAT firewall for an additional $1 per month. That's a bit odd, since many other companies include this feature for free. Ivacy also has dedicated IP addresses for $1.99 per month in Australia, Canada, Germany, Hong Kong, Singapore, as well as the UK and the US. A dedicated IP is less likely to be blocked, since it won't be immediately recognized as part of a VPN's IP block.
This approach worked for a few months until it caught the attention of Netflix, and a subsequent crackdown blocked most smart DNS proxy users. Today, a handful of smart DNS proxy services can still unblock Netflix, but the only one that’s consistently worked for us is ExpressVPN’s MediaStreamer service. MediaStreamer is a smart DNS proxy service that comes with every ExpressVPN subscription. It’s used by default when you connect to the VPN, or you can set it up separately so that it’s used on its own.
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Netflix’s VPN ban is a blunt instrument put in place to appease copyright holders. It blocks VPN users no matter where they are located so long as a proxy is detected. This is not a fair policy to paying subscribers. Forcing users to turn off their VPNs could sacrifice privacy, especially those connected on unsecured public wi-fi networks or traveling abroad to surveillance-heavy countries.
Some VPNs have tools that are particularly useful for torrenting. NordVPN is one of several companies that offer static IP addresses for purchase, which can desirable in some circumstances. TorGuard VPN has built its entire reputation around protecting torrenters. In addition to the usual VPN protection, TorGuard also offers static IP addresses and access to special high-bandwidth connections, for an additional fee.
Even the services that do allow torrenting often have restrictions. Some, for example, may require that you only use BitTorrent when connected to specific VPN servers. NordVPN labels the servers where torrenting is acceptable. TorGuard VPN, on the other hand, does not make any distinction about user traffic, so you can torrent to your heart's content. Note that pretty much every VPN service that allows torrenting also explicitly forbids breaking copyright law, or otherwise abusing the service.

Hi Paula, thanks for the question. File sharing is indeed under fire in countries like the US, UK, Canada and Australia. But you can engage in P2P/File-sharing activity from these countries by connecting to the VPN servers of the countries where File Shharing is legal. As long as you don’t engage in any copyright infringements, you have nothing to worry about. However, anti-file-sharing measures are usually very limited and are usually always preceeded by rather harmless warning notices by the ISP so you have a bit of a margin in case you ever get flagged during a P2P session in the event of a worst case scenario.
Some VPN services offer even longer subscription periods. KeepSolid VPN Unlimited, for example, lives up to its name with an effectively life-long plan. It also offers billing periods as short as one week, which is great for travelers who want a VPN only for a vacation or business trip. At PCMag, however, we recommend using a VPN as often as possible.
But wait, can’t the piracy groups then go to the anonymizer service and requisition their logs to figure out what you’re downloading? Theoretically, yes, but if you’re using a truly good anonymizer, they don’t keep logs, so there’s no paper trail of activity leading back to you. All the piracy monitors see is a proxy service sharing a file, and all your ISP sees is you connecting to a proxy service. If you encrypt your BitTorrent traffic (which we recommend), your ISP won’t even be able to see that you’re using BitTorrent.

CyberGhost makes it easy to unblock Netflix in just a few clicks. The app’s streaming section lists servers by what they unblock, instead of just their location. Netflix is clearly listed right at the top, and clicking it will turn on the VPN and even open Netflix on your behalf. Users can give instant feedback as to whether a particular server works with Netflix with simple thumbs up, thumbs down buttons.
Antivirus software protects you from malware, but to protect your privacy and security on the web, you need a virtual private network, or VPN. Ivacy offers VPN protection at an affordable price and boasts servers in far-flung corners of the world. It's a strong offering on paper, but we had some hiccups in testing. At the end of the day, it can't match our Editors' Choice winners NordVPN, Private Internet Access, and TunnelBear VPN in terms of robustness or ease of use.
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