If you frequent ThePirateBay, uTorrent, RARBG, Putlocker or KickassTorrents, however, chances are what you download from these torrenting sites is not legal. Government authorities can fine you for committing a civil offense, while ISPs and copyright holders will threaten and in some cases follow through on legal action. While it’s unlikely that a record company will take someone to court, they might seek damages through settlements.
Torrent is like a bucket full of gold. I remember the time when I downloaded Transformers, Wolf of Wall Street and Ironman from the torrent, until I received this copyright infringement notice. I searched the internet to continue using the torrents as I can’t afford spending hundreds of dollar on movies. So, I came up with VPN, VPN has enabled me to download unlimited movies on monthly basis. Thanks for sharing such a good post!
I've read the reviews up on here and some of them make me laugh. Like the ones where the people have problems using Ivacy and say Ivacy is greedy. There is always somebody like that. Makes it so that an excellent product only gets a 75% rating. I think the other VPNs must be spamming this review page because those negative reviewers are plum loco. I've used Ivacy for 5 years and I have had very few problems. Sure it may go down 1-2 times a year for a few minutes. But all VPNs do. Just change servers if you get bent over that. Lately Ivacy has been perfect for like the last 2 years not going down for me at all. And this crap about slow speeds it nonsense. I download about 12 GB/ hour with my 100Mbs connection. If that isn't fast enough for you then I'm sorry for you you spoiled brat. And using Ivacy I'm way faster than the public DNS servers I choose to use. And those people who can't get Ivacy up and running are technophobes. And I always check out secure at privacy-check websites like IPVanish, PRC or DNSLeaktest.com. But hey there's always somebody who hates ice cream. Know what I'm saying? Ivacy has a 0 log policy. It allows P2P. It doesn't have any bandwidth limits. And here's the kicker: lifetime VPN for $80US(this article is sorely lacking having failed to mention that fact). Although Ivacy doesn't exactly advertise that fact. Ya have to be in the loop to know that, and now you're in the loop. So my 5 years with good 'ol Ivacy has cost me exactly $1.33US/mo(at this writing_Sept. '18)), and every month that figure falls because I'm lifetime. No other VPN costs so little. The other VPNs are scalping the foolish. Imaging paying $100US+ for VPN per year. Ok don't imagine it. Just sign up with 70% of the so called "Good VPNs". Reminds me of the whole telecommunication scam where people overpay for TV or phone service(I don't own a TV (arggggggh I have Kodi !)and I use Tello for Phone because I'm not made out of money, cheap you might say, working the system I say). Other VPN users are slaves to the grind I also say. Anyway Ivacy makes all the other VPN services seem greedy. I'm not worried about 5-eyes. Or lack of TOR compatibility. And I gave up Netflix aeons ago when their price jumped(I was grandfathered in because I was on the original plan but all things come to an end like my Netflix account, I don't suffer because I just ________ any movie I want and who uses VPN to stream Netflix or stream anything anyway?). Seems like the author of this review was grasping at straws to fill in the "Cons" section. I just want anonymity occasionally when I'm online because I like P2P. And no this isn't spam or fanboy ravings. It's just the facts. Have a good life.
Awful VPN. The app has a ton of features, but take a closer look and see most of them don't actually work at all. Split tunnelling for instance only appears to split you traffic, but actually doesn't. The worst are the dropouts in connection that remain undetected. While running the app I have checked my IP regularly for a full day. Over the course of 8 hours my IP wasn't hidden for 14 (!) times. The app itself just keeps running and even the internet kill switch doesn't kick into action therefore committing the cardinal VPN sin of letting it's user IP exposed.
If cost is a major hurdle, fear not. There are many excellent free VPNs on the market. Our Editors' Choice winner, TunnelBear, offers a free version with a limited amount of data available. ProtonVPN, on the other hand, limits the number of simultaneous devices and available servers to its free customers. Ivacy does not, however, offer a free version.
I then drop the highest and lowest results and average what remains to use as a baseline. Next I perform the same tests, but with the VPN active, and compare the results in order to find a percentage change. In order to get a sense of how spoofing your location with a VPN affects performance, I perform the international version of these tests, using a VPN server in Australia and an Ookla test server in Anchorage, Alaska. Because I couldn't connect to an Australian server with Ivacy, I selected the next-furthest service from the towering PCMag Labs in New York City.

Some VPNs redirect users to the US version of Netflix regardless of server location. NordVPN, for example, can unblock Netflix when connected to any country, but uses a DNS proxy to route Netflix requests to the US version, except for Australia, Canada, Japan, Netherlands, and UK. Opening Netflix while connected to any other country through NordVPN will return the US version. And though Surfshark users can access Netflix on any server, they all redirect to the US version except France, India, Japan, the Netherlands, and the UK. Similarly, AirVPN redirects many international users to US Netflix regardless of their VPN server’s IP address.
The short answer is a big yes. Internet Service Providers can effortlessly crack open one of these pipes and log or monitor all your Internet traffic data, including all your browsing history and sometimes even the content of your emails. Depending on where you reside and who your Internet provider is, they may actually be mandated to log your internet data and forward it on to law enforcement, copyright extortionists, and advertisers.
Yes, @Alice i also have to face the similar issue, in fact, i was very annoyed when I received a infringement notice first time in my life, although I usually take proper steps to make my torrenting private and for this purpose I normally use peer block and cyber ghost free vpn whenever I did torrent, well it was very frustrating moment when I received another notice and then my friend tell me that paid vpns provide 9 times much better protection than free ones. However according to above mentioned table I taking account from ivacy and I hope It will work better.
Your last alternative is to try a new file sharing service entirely, like Usenet. It offers encrypted connections and doesn’t connect to peers, so others can’t track what you’re doing. It doesn’t always have the selection that BitTorrent has (depending on what you’re downloading), but it offers a ton of other advantages, most notably higher speeds and better privacy. Check out our guide to getting started with Usenet to see if it’s right for you.
Overall, Ivacy performed remarkably poorly in the domestic tests. I assume this is because of its comparatively small pool of servers. Companies with more, or more strategic, server placement are more likely to provide better service since you are more likely to be close to their servers. Ivacy's international performance was better, but it only showed better results than its domestic scores; it never stood out in an already crowded space. TorGuard VPN is, for now, the fastest VPN I've yet tested, as it has the smallest impact on internet performance.

All connections are securely encrypted, and you can even opt to obfuscate traffic using a special “Scramble” feature that disguises OpenVPN connections. DNS leak protection and a kill switch are built into the apps. StrongVPN has long been a favorite among users in China, and its recent upgrades make it appeal to a wider audience including torrenters.


Still making up your mind about getting Ivacy VPN app for your iPhone? You really don't need to be skeptical because Ivacy for PC has a 30-day money-back guarantee*. So, if you are not pleased with the VPN app or its myriad features, you can always ask for a refund within the first 30-days of subscription! We believe in 100% customer satisfaction and we strive for nothing less!

PrivateVPN unblocks Netflix in more countries than any other provider—no small feat for a young VPN with only a hundred or so servers. The servers that work best for streaming are clearly labelled in the app, which is simple and novice-friendly. PrivateVPN scored well in our speed tests, meaning you can continue to stream your favorite Netflix shows in high definition.

The Copyright Modernization Act passed in January 2014 requires ISPs send notices to copyright violators on their networks. The recipients’ identities are stored on ISP servers for six months. Copyright holders cannot sue for damages of more than $5,000 when the copy is used for non-commercial purposes, which in most cases simply isn’t worth the time or effort.


Ivacy VPN for Windows has been specifically crafted for the OS and its environment. Secure your Windows-powered devices by becoming anonymous. Unblock and access any and all sites no matter your location. Download torrents, share information and content securely. Customer support available 24/7 and Risk-free investment with a 30-day money back guarantee. Join 50K+ users who benefit from the best Windows VPN, Ivacy.
However, the law states that fines cannot be artificially high, so damages that copyright holders can exact are capped. Early in 2018, Netherlands’ privacy watchdog, Autoriteit Persoonsgegevens (AP), gave permission to Dutch Filmworks to collect IP addresses of anyone illegally downloading content. The company can hand out fines to users and have decided on a fee of 150 Euros per film.
Ivacy also has some very strategically positioned servers. While most VPN companies ignore the entire continent of Africa, Ivacy has six locations. South and Central America is another region passed over by many VPN companies, but not Ivacy. It also provides servers in regions with repressive internet censorship, including China, Russia, and Turkey.
Hide.me is a fast VPN that has apps for all major platforms including iPhone and Android. In the free version, you can only connect to three servers and get 2GB per month. Hide.me also does not have OpenVPN support, which might be a disappointment for security-conscious users. Hide.me does, however, support PPTP, L2TP, SSTP, and IPSec. While you only get 3 servers to choose from, you can download torrents without any restrictions (except for the data limit). Find out what real Hide.me users have to say here.
In addition to the special Netflix server, PrivateVPN has a guide on how to unlock Netflix from your native account, which includes a list of servers which might allow you to access the streaming service — suggesting that while they keep the list updated, it’s possible that it could change any time. We were able to access Netflix from several of the servers on the list, including the two in the U.S.
The main reason to use a VPN is to protect your data from being spied upon by ISPs, hackers, and three-letter government agencies. So it wouldn't make sense to use a service that would spy on you, too. In order to evaluate what efforts VPN companies take to protect your privacy, I read through their entire privacy policy and discuss issues with company representatives.
Apparently it is under the 5 eyes legal jurisdiction so that's a serious issue for oppressive internet regulation, who knows what could be traced or planted on your tech under these circumstances, there are many affordable VPNs running in countries outside this law i would recommend you go to them instead. Also the auto-connect feature is bogus for me and doesn't work, it just sits at "connecting" then times out, you have to manually pick which country you can login with, and PC users can't pick their city to login to but phone users can? why? Could be better, a lot better.
Using a VPN goes a long way to improving your personal security, but it's not a bulletproof, magical solution. When it comes to security, we often say that it's better to think of tools like VPNs as raising the effort required to successfully attack you. If someone is willing to invest the time and money in targeting you specifically, they will eventually get what they're after. A VPN needs to be part of a layered approach to security and can't take the place of critical tools, such as good antivirus software.
But, despite the thousands of hours of content available to Netflix users in each country, they still want more and you know what the best part about it is? That they can get! Actually, Netflix is a geo-restricted site which means that while most of its shows can be watched worldwide irrespective of which country you are located in, it does offer a significant number of shows in some countries while blacking the rest out from viewing them.
You have a few different options when it comes to hiding your BitTorrent activity, but we’ve found that a proxy is the most convenient and easiest to set up, so that’s what we’re going to cover here. We’ve talked about proxies a few times before, most notably with our original guide on how to set up BTGuard our guide to safe torrenting post-Demonoid. Unfortunately, BTGuard has never been a great service—it was just the most convenient. Thankfully, Private Internet Access—one of our favorite VPN providers—now provides a proxy very similar to BTGuard, but with faster speeds and better customer service. So we recommend using it instead, using the instructions below. If you don’t want to use a proxy, check out the end of the article for a few alternative suggestions.
A VPN masks your IP address so that other devices in the swarm only see the IP address of the P2P VPN server. The best VPNs for torrenting typically use shared IP addresses, meaning dozens and even hundreds of users are assigned the same IP address. This large pool of users makes it next to impossible to trace torrenting activity back to a single person. Furthermore, if you use one of the logless VPNs on this list, the VPN provider won’t have any user information to hand over when hit with a DMCA notice or settlement letter.
Thanks for your comment. As far as comparing AirVPN with PureVPN goes, there’s a lot of difference between the two. PureVPN has servers in over 140 countries whereas AirVPN has only a handful of servers. If we compare the prices, then PureVPN also has an edge over AirVPN. On the contrary, AirVPN and PureVPN offer similar security measures: OpenVPN protocol and AES 256 bit encryption.
While ubiquitous, streaming video is far from universal. For example, outside the US, Netflix customers can enjoy Star Trek: Discovery, but US residents need a CBS AllAccess account to view those continuing voyages. If you're traveling out of the country, you may discover that the show you were in the middle of watching on Netflix just isn't available anymore.
In addition to creating encrypted tunnels for your web traffic, many VPNs are packing in extra options to help stand out in an increasingly crowded space. It's not unusual to see ad-blocking, network-based phishing protection, and other security features included with your VPN. TunnelBear, for example, even offers standalone apps for ad-blocking and password management, complete with cute bears.
With Netflix, the problem is that they are improving on detecting VPNs and blocking them. But there is this gap, that if your VPN provider regularly creates new servers, that are unknown to Netflix, you will have a possibility to access the geo-blocked content. I found NordVPN to be the best fit because I can pick the newest servers myself and they are always creating new ones. I did talk with NordVPNs customer support about the fuzz going around Netflix blocking VPNs. They assured me that new servers are the key to bypass the restrictions. Also, this feature is handy when one server is full of users, and the speed gets a bit slow. From my personal experience, I can say, that Netflix US/AU worked great and I could watch all the shows, that were primarily blocked because of my location.
When you surf the web, your internet traffic isn't necessarily secure. Someone could be lurking on the same network as you, monitoring your activities. That's especially true when you're using a public Wi-Fi network. Clever attackers can even create bogus Wi-Fi networks that impersonate legit ones, tricking you into connecting and exposing your personal information.
The number of servers, however, can be a bit deceiving. Some VPN companies make extensive use of virtual server locations. These are physical servers configured to behave as if they are actually several servers in different locations. This is an issue for anyone concerned about the precise path of their data. You might be miffed to discover that by selecting a server in the data haven of Iceland, that it was actually being routed through a virtual server in Shanghai.
×