Netflix’s VPN ban is a blunt instrument put in place to appease copyright holders. It blocks VPN users no matter where they are located so long as a proxy is detected. This is not a fair policy to paying subscribers. Forcing users to turn off their VPNs could sacrifice privacy, especially those connected on unsecured public wi-fi networks or traveling abroad to surveillance-heavy countries.
When you point your browser at a website, it sends a request to the server that hosts the website and returns with the content you want. It's a bit different when you use a VPN. When a VPN is active, it creates an encrypted tunnel between your computer and a server controlled by the VPN provider. From there, your request exits onto the worldwide internet as normal, returning via the VPN server and through the encrypted tunnel.

Private Internet Access is primarily a VPN provider. We’ll talk a bit more about VPNs later in this post, but what we really want is the SOCKS5 proxy that comes with their VPN service. So, head to Private Internet Access’ web site and sign up for their VPN service. We recommend starting out with a monthly plan to see if you like it before buying a whole year’s subscription.

It is obvious that Ivacy is a brilliant VPN to use alongside IPTV. Not only does it lifts geo-restrictions allowing you to harness the full potential of IPTV, it also adds to a sense of security that you wouldn't experience without it. The security is iron clad, and is practically impregnable. If you want to enjoy IPTV streaming from anywhere in the world Ivacy VPN ought to be your pick.


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To ensure that it’s working, head over to Torguard’s IP Checker. This site can tell you what your IP address is, and compare it to the IP address of your torrent client, which will let you know whether your proxy is working correctly. To test it, hit the “Generate Torrent” button, and open the resulting torrent in uTorrent. Then, go back to your browser and hit the Refresh button under the “Check IP” tab. If it’s the same as your browser IP—which you’ll see next to the Refresh button—then your proxy isn’t working, and you’ll want to double-check all of the above settings. If it shows a different IP address (which should be in the Netherlands), then Private Internet Access is successfully tunneling all your traffic for you.

When using a Netflix native app, however, the app can override the DNS routing used by a VPN and send requests to your nearest public DNS server. This means Netflix can determine the user’s true location and block them accordingly, even with a VPN app switched on. ExpressVPN and NordVPN have figured out how to overcome this behavior, so they both work with the iOS and Android Netflix apps so this won’t be a problem for if you are using one of these two VPNs.
With Netflix, the problem is that they are improving on detecting VPNs and blocking them. But there is this gap, that if your VPN provider regularly creates new servers, that are unknown to Netflix, you will have a possibility to access the geo-blocked content. I found NordVPN to be the best fit because I can pick the newest servers myself and they are always creating new ones. I did talk with NordVPNs customer support about the fuzz going around Netflix blocking VPNs. They assured me that new servers are the key to bypass the restrictions. Also, this feature is handy when one server is full of users, and the speed gets a bit slow. From my personal experience, I can say, that Netflix US/AU worked great and I could watch all the shows, that were primarily blocked because of my location.
Others argue it is unnecessary and, when using a torrenting VPN service, only serves to make torrenting more difficult and can even degrade user privacy. This is because other users sharing the same VPN IP address will all be limited to the same ports except for the one who chooses to port forward. That can make P2P activity more easy to trace back to a single user.
Surfshark is a relatively new provider that makes it easy to unblock Netflix. There’s no trial and error here, because all of SurfShark’s servers can unblock Netflix. Most of them will redirect you to the US version of Netflix, but it does offer local versions for a handful of countries including Canada, France, and Japan. Speeds are good fast enough to stream in HD without buffering without compromising security.
Hi Paula, thanks for the question. File sharing is indeed under fire in countries like the US, UK, Canada and Australia. But you can engage in P2P/File-sharing activity from these countries by connecting to the VPN servers of the countries where File Shharing is legal. As long as you don’t engage in any copyright infringements, you have nothing to worry about. However, anti-file-sharing measures are usually very limited and are usually always preceeded by rather harmless warning notices by the ISP so you have a bit of a margin in case you ever get flagged during a P2P session in the event of a worst case scenario.
Hide.me is a fast VPN that has apps for all major platforms including iPhone and Android. In the free version, you can only connect to three servers and get 2GB per month. Hide.me also does not have OpenVPN support, which might be a disappointment for security-conscious users. Hide.me does, however, support PPTP, L2TP, SSTP, and IPSec. While you only get 3 servers to choose from, you can download torrents without any restrictions (except for the data limit). Find out what real Hide.me users have to say here.
Private Internet Access is primarily a VPN provider. We’ll talk a bit more about VPNs later in this post, but what we really want is the SOCKS5 proxy that comes with their VPN service. So, head to Private Internet Access’ web site and sign up for their VPN service. We recommend starting out with a monthly plan to see if you like it before buying a whole year’s subscription.
Many VPN companies now offer browser extensions in addition to native apps. These are much more lightweight than their desktop companions and have the added advantage of being available anywhere you log in to a browser. The downside, as I discovered when working with Chromebook VPNs, is that VPN browser extensions only encrypt your browser traffic. The rest of your computer's data travels outside the encrypted tunnel.
When you download or seed a torrent, you’re connecting to a bunch of other people, called a swarm. All of those people can see your computer’s IP address—they have to in order to connect. That’s all very handy when you’re sharing files with other netizens, but file sharers such as yourself aren’t necessarily the only people paying attention. Piracy monitoring groups (often paid for by the entertainment industry either before or after they find violators) also join BitTorrent swarms, but instead of sharing files, they’re logging the IP addresses of other people in the swarm—including you—so that they can notify your ISP of your doings.
If you are going to use BitTorrent for whatever reason, good luck to you. If you are going to use a VPN, more power to you. But be sure that you take the time to read the VPN's terms of service before you start. And be aware of the local laws and possible penalties before you start, whatever your willingness to obey them. "I didn't know the law," or "I don't agree with the law," won't hold up as defenses in a court, so make sure you can live with any potential punishments should you choose to do something legally dubious.
Unfortunately, I found that Ivacy didn't always work as advertised. Part of my testing involves connecting to a VPN server in Australia. For whatever reason, Ivacy couldn't successfully connect with any of the Australian VPN servers I selected. That's disappointing. I had a similar problem when testing the Firefox and Chrome browser extensions, except those wouldn't connect to any servers. Ivacy needs to clean up its act in this regard.
The practical upshot is that no one can intercept your web traffic as it moves from your computer to the VPN server. And if you're connecting to websites via HTTPS (which you should), your data remains encrypted for its entire journey, even after it leaves the VPN server. This is why you need a VPN. VPNs are particularly important when you're using public Wi-Fi or unfamiliar networks. In these situations, hackers may be lurking on the network or even running the network themselves, hoping to snag your personal information.
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