With Ivacy VPN you can unlock the full potential of IPTV. As it makes your IP anonymous, not even your ISP can track your online activity. This means that you can watch the entertainment that you desire without anyone limiting you whatsoever. Ivacy VPN in particular boasts a military grade security as it uses 256-bit encryption to protect the users' incoming and outgoing traffic.
Panama-based NordVPN keeps neither connection nor traffic logs. 256-bit AES encryption with perfect forward secrecy is the default, along with optional double-hop encryption and Tor over VPN features. Speeds are great, but can be a bit volatile. DNS leak protection and a kill switch can both be toggled on in the settings. The traditional all-or-nothing kill switch is one option, or you can specify which programs get cut off from the internet if the VPN connection drops, such as a BitTorrent client.
Ivacy offers only 459 servers, a bit below the 500-server minimum threshold I have come to expect. In fact, so many VPN services are now exceeding 700 and even 1,000 servers that I may need to raise the cutoff soon. NordVPN currently leads the pack with over 3,400 servers, and Private Internet Access is close behind with 3,275. TorGuard recently expanded its offering to 3,000 servers, placing it among the three most robust services I have yet reviewed.
Similar to the US, copyright trolls send threatening letters to torrenters after identifying their IP address. While we’re not legal experts in German law, the consensus of what to do if you receive a letter is also similar to the US: if it doesn’t identify you by name and doesn’t come directly from the police, ignore it and just let the statute of limitations period expire.
Ivacy's privacy is longer and less clear than I like, but entirely readable. It might sound a bit odd, but I actually have preferences when it comes to privacy policies. TunnelBear's, for example, is very easy to read and includes pop-outs to explain the company's thinking and complex issues. TorGuard has, perhaps, the shortest and most glib of privacy policies.
Some VPNs redirect users to the US version of Netflix regardless of server location. NordVPN, for example, can unblock Netflix when connected to any country, but uses a DNS proxy to route Netflix requests to the US version, except for Australia, Canada, Japan, Netherlands, and UK. Opening Netflix while connected to any other country through NordVPN will return the US version. And though Surfshark users can access Netflix on any server, they all redirect to the US version except France, India, Japan, the Netherlands, and the UK. Similarly, AirVPN redirects many international users to US Netflix regardless of their VPN server’s IP address.
CyberGhost adheres to a no-logs policy, uses 256-bit AES encryption with perfect forward secrecy, and has a kill switch on its desktop clients. An app-specific kill switch is buried in the settings, dubbed “app protection,” which will only cut off internet to specified programs, e.g. a torrent client. CyberGhost Pro scored well in our speed tests and can even unblock US Netflix and Amazon Prime Video.
One of the major reasons why people recommend VPN over proxies is that torrent clients reveal your true location and leak information while using proxy. Although, the latest version of torrent clients are designed to do a better job at this but I personally don’t trust proxy services. They can be unreliable and fail to protect you while using torrents. I would rather stick with a VPN just because of this. Currently, I am using PIA (Private Internet Access) but I have also heard good reviews about PureVPN.
Morgan says Netflix probably isn’t targeting isolated VPN providers. He believes a combination of techniques is used to block them. One of those techniques, says LiquidVPN CEO Dave Cox, is by identifying connections coming from data centers instead of residences. He goes on to explain that the Netflix apps combat SmartDNS services by forcing you to use a public DNS server and frequently change the URLs that do geolocation for their content. This makes it impossible for services that could support thousands of customers streaming at a time by only forwarding the geolocation packets through their servers.
Ivacy's privacy is longer and less clear than I like, but entirely readable. It might sound a bit odd, but I actually have preferences when it comes to privacy policies. TunnelBear's, for example, is very easy to read and includes pop-outs to explain the company's thinking and complex issues. TorGuard has, perhaps, the shortest and most glib of privacy policies.
I've read the reviews up on here and some of them make me laugh. Like the ones where the people have problems using Ivacy and say Ivacy is greedy. There is always somebody like that. Makes it so that an excellent product only gets a 75% rating. I think the other VPNs must be spamming this review page because those negative reviewers are plum loco. I've used Ivacy for 5 years and I have had very few problems. Sure it may go down 1-2 times a year for a few minutes. But all VPNs do. Just change servers if you get bent over that. Lately Ivacy has been perfect for like the last 2 years not going down for me at all. And this crap about slow speeds it nonsense. I download about 12 GB/ hour with my 100Mbs connection. If that isn't fast enough for you then I'm sorry for you you spoiled brat. And using Ivacy I'm way faster than the public DNS servers I choose to use. And those people who can't get Ivacy up and running are technophobes. And I always check out secure at privacy-check websites like IPVanish, PRC or DNSLeaktest.com. But hey there's always somebody who hates ice cream. Know what I'm saying? Ivacy has a 0 log policy. It allows P2P. It doesn't have any bandwidth limits. And here's the kicker: lifetime VPN for $80US(this article is sorely lacking having failed to mention that fact). Although Ivacy doesn't exactly advertise that fact. Ya have to be in the loop to know that, and now you're in the loop. So my 5 years with good 'ol Ivacy has cost me exactly $1.33US/mo(at this writing_Sept. '18)), and every month that figure falls because I'm lifetime. No other VPN costs so little. The other VPNs are scalping the foolish. Imaging paying $100US+ for VPN per year. Ok don't imagine it. Just sign up with 70% of the so called "Good VPNs". Reminds me of the whole telecommunication scam where people overpay for TV or phone service(I don't own a TV (arggggggh I have Kodi !)and I use Tello for Phone because I'm not made out of money, cheap you might say, working the system I say). Other VPN users are slaves to the grind I also say. Anyway Ivacy makes all the other VPN services seem greedy. I'm not worried about 5-eyes. Or lack of TOR compatibility. And I gave up Netflix aeons ago when their price jumped(I was grandfathered in because I was on the original plan but all things come to an end like my Netflix account, I don't suffer because I just ________ any movie I want and who uses VPN to stream Netflix or stream anything anyway?). Seems like the author of this review was grasping at straws to fill in the "Cons" section. I just want anonymity occasionally when I'm online because I like P2P. And no this isn't spam or fanboy ravings. It's just the facts. Have a good life.
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