Another great benefit is the fact that most VPN services operate a network of servers located across the globe. In other words, the user can select a server located in a specific country, and have a new IP address from that country. With a VPN, anyone monitoring your traffic only sees the IP address of the VPN server. Your location, IP address, downloads, and Internet activity are masked behind the VPN.
To ensure that it’s working, head over to Torguard’s IP Checker. This site can tell you what your IP address is, and compare it to the IP address of your torrent client, which will let you know whether your proxy is working correctly. To test it, hit the “Generate Torrent” button, and open the resulting torrent in uTorrent. Then, go back to your browser and hit the Refresh button under the “Check IP” tab. If it’s the same as your browser IP—which you’ll see next to the Refresh button—then your proxy isn’t working, and you’ll want to double-check all of the above settings. If it shows a different IP address (which should be in the Netherlands), then Private Internet Access is successfully tunneling all your traffic for you.
Unfortunately, I found that Ivacy didn't always work as advertised. Part of my testing involves connecting to a VPN server in Australia. For whatever reason, Ivacy couldn't successfully connect with any of the Australian VPN servers I selected. That's disappointing. I had a similar problem when testing the Firefox and Chrome browser extensions, except those wouldn't connect to any servers. Ivacy needs to clean up its act in this regard.
There isn't much we can do to stop Internet Service Providers monitoring and logging policies in the future. However, we can take our fate into our own hands by encrypting our Internet traffic and data to keep it private before we send it down the pipe, and that is where Windscribe VPN for Chrome comes in. The ultimate aim of Windscribe is to provide easy to use tools that guard the online identity of every Chrome Browser user.
Romania-based CyberGhost allows P2P filesharing on any server that isn’t located in the US or Russia. Due to legal pressure, CyberGhost actively blocks BitTorrent traffic in those two countries (presumably by blocking popular ports used by BitTorrent clients, but we haven’t tested this). CyberGhost isn’t wholly adverse to torrenting, though, and even has a “Torrent Anonymously” profile that will connect you to the best torrenting VPN server available.
Others argue it is unnecessary and, when using a torrenting VPN service, only serves to make torrenting more difficult and can even degrade user privacy. This is because other users sharing the same VPN IP address will all be limited to the same ports except for the one who chooses to port forward. That can make P2P activity more easy to trace back to a single user.
It is obvious that Ivacy is a brilliant VPN to use alongside IPTV. Not only does it lifts geo-restrictions allowing you to harness the full potential of IPTV, it also adds to a sense of security that you wouldn't experience without it. The security is iron clad, and is practically impregnable. If you want to enjoy IPTV streaming from anywhere in the world Ivacy VPN ought to be your pick.

“We are receiving an unprecedented number of inquiries from people looking to access Netflix service, suggesting there are not a lot of VPNs left that offer an alternative workaround,” NordVPN CIO Emanuel Morgan tells Comparitech. “Keeping up with offering new workaround solutions might require significant resources and it is understandable that some services chose to forgo advocating for this issue – choosing to concentrate their resources on primary service functions (offering privacy and security solutions) instead.”
If you plan on using a VPN while torrenting, consider the ramifications of the Kill Switch. This feature, found in most VPN services, prevents apps from sending data via the internet when the VPN is disconnected. The idea is that it prevents any information from being transmitted in the clear. The avid BitTorrent downloader needs to decide if they want total and complete protection, or would rather not have their download interrupted.
Using a VPN almost certainly means losing some internet speed because your data is taking a longer, more circuitous path than usual. With a VPN you can expect an increase in latency, as well as a reduction in download and upload speeds. When I review VPNs, I first run a series of tests using Ookla's internet speed test tool. (Note that Ookla is owned by Ziff Davis, which also owns PCMag.) Ookla tests latency, upload speed, and download speed, so those are the figures I look at as well.
Ivacy offers apps for Android, iOS, macOS, and Windows. There are also instructions to run Ivacy on Linux, a router, Kodi home theater software, and to connect consoles like the Xbox to the VPN via another device. An Xbox over a VPN is a nice option if you happen to play games with online competitors that like to DDoS your connection to mess with your ability to play.
If cost is a major hurdle, fear not. There are many excellent free VPNs on the market. Our Editors' Choice winner, TunnelBear, offers a free version with a limited amount of data available. ProtonVPN, on the other hand, limits the number of simultaneous devices and available servers to its free customers. Ivacy does not, however, offer a free version.
This is another VPN that features a built-in killswitch, so even if leaks were detected, your torrenting security would still be protected. The problem with leaks is that they often go undetected. So an oblivious user would carry on, thinking that they were safe and secure, all the while their ISP is watching every move they make. A killswitch counteracts this vulnerability.
Overall, Ivacy performed remarkably poorly in the domestic tests. I assume this is because of its comparatively small pool of servers. Companies with more, or more strategic, server placement are more likely to provide better service since you are more likely to be close to their servers. Ivacy's international performance was better, but it only showed better results than its domestic scores; it never stood out in an already crowded space. TorGuard VPN is, for now, the fastest VPN I've yet tested, as it has the smallest impact on internet performance.
A Virtual Private Network routes traffic through its servers to create secure connections. When you use a VPN software on your computer, you get connected to a secure VPN server. The server then connects to the websites or computers that you want to visit. All data transmitted between your computer and the sites that you visit gets encrypted through the VPN, ensuring that your activity is completely anonymous.
Torrent websites and torrents themselves are havens for malware. Because torrents are uploaded by the community, they often go unchecked for viruses and malware. A case in early 2018 saw 400,000 users hit by a malware outbreak caused by a Russian torrenting client. Every time you download a torrent, it’s a good idea to scan it with good, up-to-date antivirus software. If the website you downloaded from has a comments section, other users might have already posted about potential threats. This is especially true for software and video games that contain a lot of files, making it easier to hide malicious files.
Another great benefit is the fact that most VPN services operate a network of servers located across the globe. In other words, the user can select a server located in a specific country, and have a new IP address from that country. With a VPN, anyone monitoring your traffic only sees the IP address of the VPN server. Your location, IP address, downloads, and Internet activity are masked behind the VPN.
First, it prevents your ISP and anyone else on your local and ISP network from seeing that you are torrenting. Because all of the files you download and upload via BitTorrent are encrypted when they pass through your ISP’s servers, their contents cannot be identified. It would take a monumental time- and resource-consuming effort for an ISP to even attempt to crack the encryption put in place by your VPN service.
Ivacy's mode for distribution on iPhone is similar to its Android strategy. Again, it offers a free version called Ivacy Lite and the main app called simply Ivacy VPN. We haven't had the chance to test either version, but we look forward to seeing how it compares with other iPhone VPN apps. I'll update this review once we get one of these apps into the lab.
After installing Ivacy VPN, you need to visit the dashboard and change your server to the UK location. You will now be able to watch the program of your choice. If you're unsure as to what a server is and this means for your online IPTV experience then keep reading as we will detail the features of Ivacy VPN and how they could benefit you later on in the article.
In the latency tests, Ivacy performed noticeably poorly and increased latency by 2,360 percent. This is the second-worst score I have recorded, after AnchorFree Hotspot Shield's abysmal 3,145.4 percent increase. TorGuard VPN had the best score in these tests, actually reducing latency by 6.7 percent. Ivacy performed much better in the international tests, where it increased latency by 292.5 percent. That's nipping at the heels of TunnelBear, which increased latency by 270.31 percent.

I have used Ivacy for almost two years and just a couple of failures with their KILL SWITCH. The downloading of my data stopped….very nice. Unfortunately the uploading did not! This has happened numerous times and the last time I got the letter from Hollywood via my Internet provider. Something about a copyright infringement. This is the second one while using the Ivacy program. Various servers in numerous countries, yet I am getting the same IP address assigned to me when I hook up.
×